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Full text of "Loretto roll of honour, 1914-1920"

LORETTO 
ROLL OF HONOUR 



1914-1920 



♦ 



Spartam nactus es ; hanc exorna 



ft. 36' 



ir, 



National Library of Scotland 
*B000335114* 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/lorettorollofhon1925lore 




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Loretto 
Roll of Honour 

1914—1920 



All that they had they gave 



* 



Living or dead we are comrades all " 




Roll of Honour 



Bombardier Thomas Frank Aitchison, R.G.A., was born 
in July 1880, and came to Loretto in 1895. He was 
a Prefect and a member of the XV. During the 
war he joined the Royal Artillery and was posted to 
the 276th Siege Battery at Ypres in 1917. In June 
1918 this Battery was attached to the Guards 
Brigade, and at the Armistice was at Maubeuge, 
26 men only out of the original 160 being left. 
Bombardier Aitchison was taken ill whilst still serving, 
and died in the Military Hospital, Edinburgh Castle, 
under an operation on June 14, 1919. 

Captain George Hely-Hutchinson Almond, R.A.M.C., 
was born in February 1877, and at Loretto 1892 
to 1897. Prefect and XV. He went to Hertford 
Coll., Oxon., left the 'Varsity to serve with the Im- 
perial Yeomanry in South Africa, returned and took 
his B.A. in 1902, and became M.R.C.S.(E.), L.R.C.P. 
in 1906. He was then appointed House Physician at 
St. Bartholomew's Hospital. At the outbreak of war 
he joined the R.A.M.C. and became pathologist at a 
Base Hospital in France. During the great German 
offensive in 1918 Regimental medical officers were 
urgently needed, and Capt. Almond was sent to the 
4th Dragoon Guards in the front line. He was killed, 
together with his Colonel and several others, by a 
bomb, August 9, 1918, at Caix. 



2nd Lieutenant Henry Tristram Almond, The Gordon 
Highlanders, Head's second son, universally known 
as " Hadge ", was born in December 1880, and at 
Loretto 1891 to 1901. Prefect. XV. He joined 
the Rhodesian Civil Service, and at the outbreak 
of war was Assistant Magistrate at Victoria. He 
applied for leave, but this could not be granted at 
once. Eventually he got home, obtained a commis- 
sion in the Gordons, and served at Aberdeen and at 
the Machine Gun School of Instruction at Grantham. 
In February 1916 he went to France in charge of a 
Machine-gun Section, and was killed by a German 
sniper on March 31, 1916, near Carnoy. 

Captain Rowland Latimer Almond, R.E., Head's 
youngest son, born January 1887, was at Loretto 1898 
to 1905. School Prizeman and XV. He passed into 
the R.M. Academy, Woolwich, where he was Captain 
of the XV., won the Pollock medal, and passed out 
first with honours. Gazetted to the R.E. December 
1907, he went to Chatham, where he was Captain 
of the R.E. XV. ; and later to India, where he was 
appointed to the Survey Department. In August 
1914 he was transferred to the 21st Co. 3rd Sappers 
and Miners, went to France with the 1st Indian 
Expeditionary Force, and was promoted Captain in 
October 1914. After the attack on Neuve Chapelle, 
October 28, 1914, he was reported " missing ", and as 
his body was found there in 1916 he is presumed to 
have been killed on that date. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 



Lieutenant David Anderson, M.C., 8th (Service) Battn. 
The Black Watch, att. 44th Trench Mortar Battery, 
was born in February 1887, and was at Loretto from 
1900 to 1906. After leaving school he became an 
Estate Agent in Lancashire. After the declaration 
of war he obtained a commission in the Black Watch, 
and was later attached to the 44th T.M.B. 

On May 23, 1917, during an action, Lieut. Ander- 
son was wounded in the thigh. He was being assisted 
by his servant to a shell-hole, where he might bandage 
his leg in comparative safety, when he was shot through 
the head and killed instantly. 



Captain Robert Edward Angus, R.F.C., was born in 
May 1894, and was at Loretto from 1908 to 1914. 
Corporal, O.T.C. Shooting VIII. At Easter 1914 he 
joined the Ayrshire Yeomanry, and at the outbreak 
of war was mobilised with them. He fought at 
Gallipoli in 1915, and later in Egypt, both with his 
regiment and with the armoured cars. Then he 
joined the R.F.C. and went to France with his 
squadron in October 1917. After a month's service 
he was promoted Flight Commander. On November 
20, 1917, Capt. Angus led his squadron over the 
German lines and was not seen again. The news that 
he was killed on that day came from German sources. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 



Lance-Corporal Robert Philip Annan, R.E., was born 
in May 1890, and was at Loretto from 1900 to 1907. 
After war was declared he enlisted in the Royal 
Engineers. His Field Company formed part of the 
29th Division, Dardanelles Expeditionary Force, and 
landed in Gallipoli, at Cape Helles, on April 25, 1915. 
Corporal Annan served throughout the whole of the 
Dardanelles campaign, and when the Peninsula was 
evacuated the 29th Division was sent to the Western 
front. Corporal Annan accompanied it, and served 
in France until killed by a rifle bullet at Cambrai, 
November 30, 1917. 



Lieutenant John Angus Bagnall, 4th (Terr.) Battn. 
Northumberland Fusiliers, was born in November 
1895, and was at Loretto 1910 to 1913. He enlisted 
at the outbreak of war in the 4th Northumberland 
Fusiliers, but was given his commission in November 
1914, and went to France early in 1915. On Septem- 
ber 15, 1916, his Battalion was attacking a German 
trench and Lieut. Bagnall was wounded at the first 
assault, but went on, and fought his way in with the 
bayonet. Then, seeing a wounded brother officer lying 
exposed to heavy fire outside the trench, Lieut. Bagnall 
went out to bring him to safety, and was shot dead. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 



Lieutenant Duncan Peter Bell - Irving, Canadian 
Engineers, born January 1888, and at Loretto 1901 
to 1904, passed first into the Royal Military College, 
Kingston, Canada, graduated in 1908, and obtained 
a commission in the Canadian Militia Reserve. He 
later qualified as a Civil Engineer and Land Surveyor. 
When war broke out he came to England with the 
2nd Field Company, Canadian Engineers, and crossed 
to France with them early in 1915. He was at work 
at night on the defences of the trenches held by the 
King's Own Royal Lancaster Regt. near Le Touquet 
(Armentieres), when he was shot through the head by 
a sniper and killed instantly on February 25, 1915. 



Major Roderick O. Bell Irving, D.S.O., M.C., The 
Manitoba Regt., Canadian Forces, was born in January 
1891, and was at Loretto 1904 and 1905. Very soon 
after his arrival in France he won the M.C. by captur- 
ing a machine gun single-handed, and was awarded 
the D.S.O. later. During the Battle of Cuvillers, near 
Cambrai, on October 1, 1918, his Battalion gained 
its objective, but, surrounded and unsupported, was 
forced to retire. Major Bell Irving, then Second in 
Command, wounded and with a broken leg, was seen 
being helped off the field by two Germans, a prisoner. 
Later his body was found with a bullet wound 
through the head, evidently inflicted at close range 
and in cold blood. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 



2nd Lieutenant David Alexander Beveridge, Royal 
Field Artillery, was born in November 1886, and was 
at Loretto from 1900 to 1905. He was a Prefect 
and in the XV. After leaving school he went up to 
Cambridge — Pembroke College — and took his degree. 
At the outbreak of war Lieut. Beveridge was 
commissioned in the Royal Field Artillery, and in 
1915 went with the 54th Brigade R.F.A. to the 
Dardanelles. Whilst serving in Gallipoli he was 
attacked by dysentery, of which he died in September 
1915. 



Lieutenant - Colonel Julian Falvey Beyts, The 
Durham Light Infantry, was born in September 
1888, and came to Loretto in 1900, leaving in 1903. 

Colonel Beyts was killed in action on October 8, 
1917. Unfortunately it has not been possible to 
obtain details of his services or of his death. 



2nd Lieutenant George Henry Gordon Birrell, 9th 
(Dumbartonshire) Battn. (Terr.) Argyll and Suther- 
land Highlanders, born in February 1893, was at 
Loretto 1903 to 1908. He was gazetted to the 
A. and S. Highlanders on November 3, 1914, and after 
training for a time in England the Battalion left for 
France, February 1915. On May 10, 1915, they, 
forming part of the 81st Infantry Brigade, had orders 
to take, and hold, a line of German trenches. This 
they succeeded in doing, after very heavy losses, and 
Lieut. Birrell was killed, leading his platoon towards 
the enemy's position through a terrific shell-fire, near 
Ypres (Second Battle of Ypres). 



Lieutenant Cecil William Blain, Royal Air Force, 
was born in January 1896, and at Loretto 1910 to 
1913. Corporal, O.T.C. After leaving school he took 
up farming in South Africa, but returned to England 
when war broke out and joined the Air Force. He 
went out to France, but soon after his arrival he 
was compelled to descend in the German lines near 
Cambrai owing to engine trouble during a flight, and 
became a prisoner of war. At his third attempt he 
escaped, returned to England, and was awarded the 
Air Force Cross. Lieut. Blain was then posted to the 
Aero Experimental Station at Woodbridge, Suffolk, 
and was accidentally killed whilst flying there on 
January 22, 1919. 



10 ROLL OF HONOUR 



John Mackenzie Bow, Private, Canadian Infantry, was 
born in May 1863, and was at Loretto from 1875 to 
1880. He then went to Edinburgh University, where 
he took his M.A. degree. In 1886 he won the 
Scottish one-mile bicycle championship, and was, for 
a time, President of the Scottish Amateur Athletic 
Association. 

Although upwards of fifty years of age, John Bow 
joined the Canadian Infantry as a private. He was 
killed in action in France in October 1917. 



Captain Geoege Vallance McKinlay Boyd, 17th 
(Service) Battn. Highland Light Infantry, was born 
in May 1880, and at Loretto 1896 to 1898. After 
leaving school he entered on a business career, and 
was a member of the firm of Boyd and Dunn, Stock- 
brokers, Glasgow. A very fine golfer, he won the 
South of Ireland championship in 1912, and was a 
familiar figure at the Amateur championship meetings. 
When his Battalion was raised, during the war, 
Captain Boyd was one of the first to join it, and was 
given a commission. He was promoted Captain in 
1915, and was killed on the Somme leading a charge 
at the head of his Company, July 1, 1916. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 11 



Captain and Brevet-Major Harold Brown, D.S.O., 
M.C., 4th Battn. The Green Howards (Yorkshire 
Regt.), was born in January 1879, and was at Loretto 
1895 to 1899. Prefect. B.A. Cantab. (Jesus Coll.). 
He joined the 4th (Terr.) Battn. The Yorks Regt. 
in July 1914, and served with them in France and 
Flanders. He was twice wounded on the Somme in 
1916, and a third time at Arras in 1917. Awarded the 
D.S.O. in 1916, he also won the Military Cross, was 
given the Croix de Guerre, and was gazetted Brevet- 
Major in the New Year Honours 1918. Major Brown 
was killed in action when in command of his Battalion 
on March 23, 1918. 



Lieutenant Malcolm D. Campbell, R.N.V.R., was born 
September 1890, and was at Loretto 1905 to 1908. 
Prior to the war he joined the Mersey Division 
R.N.V.R., and when, in 1914, the Royal Naval Division 
was formed, he was posted to the " Howe " Battn., 
and later promoted Lieutenant. 

Lieut. Campbell took part in the Antwerp Expedi- 
tion, and in 1915 he landed with his Battalion in 
Gallipoli on April 29. On the night of May 1 the 
first Battle of Krithia began with a general Turkish 
offensive, and at 5 a.m. Sunday, May 2, the Allies 
made a counter-attack, in which Lieut. Campbell was 
leading his Company, when a machine-gun bullet hit 
him in the head and killed him. 



12 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Lieutenant David Arthur Carmichael, The Royal 
Fusiliers (att. 25th Battn. Machine Gun Corps), born 
June 1890, was at Loretto 1905 to 1908. In 1914 he 
enlisted and was employed on the outer defences of 
London. Later, commissioned in a Battalion of the 
Royal Fusiliers, he served six months at home, then 
went to the Macedonian front, where he served nearly 
two years with the 3rd Battn. Royal Fusiliers. Trans- 
ferring to the M.G. Corps he came home, went 
through the School of Instruction, and joined the 
25th Battn. M.G. Corps in France on April 3, 1918. 
Reported " missing " after the fight at Croix du Bac 
(Armentieres), April 10, 1918, he was later reported 
" killed " on that date. 



Lieutenant Robert Henry Morris Carmichael, 5th 
(Terr.) Battn. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 
was born in January 1895, and was at Loretto from 
1909 to 1912. He had held a commission in the 5th 
A. and S. Highlanders for some time, and when war 
broke out he served at home for some months with 
his Battalion and then accompanied it to Gallipoli 
early in 1915. During the attack on Achi Baba, July 
12, 1915, the Battalion's task was to carry four suc- 
cessive Turkish trenches. This they accomplished, 
but with the loss of many men and thirteen officers. 
Lieut. Carmichael was among those who fell. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 13 



2nd Lieutenant Francis John Cathcart, The Royal 
Field Artillery, was born in August 1894, and was at 
Loretto 1909 to 1912. XV. Corporal, O.T.C. On 
leaving school he studied engineering at Edinburgh 
University, and served in the R.F.A. unit of the 
University O.T.C. At the outbreak of war he joined 
the Royal Field Artillery and was sent out to Gallipoli, 
where he saw much righting. After that he went to 
Mesopotamia and took part in the fighting during 
the advance to Bagdad, which began early in 1916. 
Lieut. Cathcart was killed in action on June 9, 1916. 



2nd Lieutenant Francis Alexander Cochran, 1st 
Battn. The Gordon Highlanders, was born in August 
1895, and was at Loretto from 1909 to 1914. XV. 
Shooting VIII. Sergt. O.T.C. At the outbreak of 
war he entered the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, 
and was gazetted to the Gordon Highlanders early 
in 1915. He joined the 1st Battn. of his Regiment 
(3rd Div. B.E.F.) at Ypres in June 1915. 

Lieut. Cochran was Battalion Bombing Officer, and 
on September 25, 1915, was leading his bombers to 
the attack, near Hooge. During the fight he was 
wounded in the right arm, but continued to throw 
bombs from his left until shot again, through the 
head, and killed. 



14 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Major Alfred Hamilton Connell, 2nd Battn. Royal 
Scots Fusiliers, was born in February 1881, and at 
Loretto 1897 to 1900. He was gazetted, shortly after 
leaving school, to the Scots Fusiliers, and served in 
South Africa. Prior to the outbreak of war he had 
been serving as Adjutant of the 3rd Battn. (S.R.) 
R.S. Fusiliers at Ayr. 

Major Connell fought at the Battle of Loos and 
came unscathed through the three days' fierce fight- 
ing on the 25th, 26th, and 27th September 1915, but 
on the 28th, whilst going round his trenches to see 
to the men's comfort after the battle, he was killed 
by a shrapnel shell. 

Captain Graham Robertson Cowie, South African 
Medical Corps, born February 1891, and at Loretto 
1905 to 1909, took his degree in Science at Oxford 
(Univ. Coll.) in 1913, and belonged to the 'Varsity 
Corps of King Edward's Horse. In August 1914 he 
rejoined this Corps, in December 1914 was commis- 
sioned in the R.F.A., and went to France and was 
mentioned in despatches after Loos, September 1915. 
In June 1916 he returned to England, resumed his 
medical studies, and qualified in 1917. 

Captain Cowie was then commissioned in the 
S.A.M.C. and attached to a General Hospital, but 
at his own request was appointed M.O. to a S.A. 
Artillery Brigade in the front line. He was wounded 
September 2, 1918, and died of his wounds next day. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 15 



2nd Lieutenant James Cyril Baptist Crozier, 2nd 
Battn. Royal Minister Fusiliers, the first Lorettonian 
to fall in the war, was born October 1890, and at 
Loretto 1906 to 1909. XV. Prefect. In 1909 he 
went to Edinburgh University, where he studied 
medicine and played for the XV. In 1912 he applied 
for, and was given, a commission in the 3rd (S.R.) 
Battn. Royal Scots Fusiliers, and passed into the 
Regular Army in June 1914. He was gazetted to 
the 2nd Munster Fusiliers and went to Flanders with 
the 1st Division B.E.F. He was killed on August 
27, 1914, near Etreux, during the retreat from Mons, 
together with seven other officers of his Battalion. 



Lieutenant Norman C. Dawson, 13th (Service) Battn. 
The King's (Liverpool) Regiment, was born in March 
1893, and was at Loretto 1908 to 1909. He obtained 
a commission in the 13th Battn. Liverpool Regt. 
after war broke out. This Battalion was in the 
Arras — Bapaume line early in 1918, when the great 
German spring offensive of 1918 broke out, with 
Amiens as its immediate objective. The British line 
was slowly forced back, and during the severe fighting 
that ensued Lieut. Dawson was killed on March 28, 
1918, near Croisilles, south of Arras, and half-way 
between that town and Bapaume. 



16 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Lieutenant Francis Ersktne Dempster, The Queen's 
Own Cameron Highlanders, was born in December 
1889, and was at Loretto from 1899 to 1908. Prefect, 
three years a member of the XV. and XI., Fives, 
and Hockey XI. 

Lieut. Dempster, after the outbreak of war, 
obtained a commission in the Cameron Highlanders 
and proceeded to France. During the Battle of the 
Somme he was reported " missing " after the action 
of July 22, 1916, and in a later casualty list was 
shown as " killed on that date ". 



Captain George Henry Dempster, 35th Sikhs, Indian 
Army, was born in December 1883, and was at Loretto 
from 1896 to 1902. He was in the XV. and XL 
After leaving school he joined the Indian Staff Corps 
and was gazetted to the 35th Sikh Regiment. 

Captain Dempster went to France in December 
1914 and was attached to the 9th Bhopal Infantry, 
Lahore Division, Indian Expeditionary Force. He 
was killed in the fight at Festubert on December 20, 
1914. At first he was officially, reported " missing ", 
but later his death was announced. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 17 



Captain Alexander Cleveland Donaldson, 6th (Ser- 
vice) Battn. Cameron Highlanders, was born in April 
1880, and at Loretto 1890 to 1899. He was a Prefect, 
and in the XV. At the outbreak of war he joined 
the Cameron Highlanders and, after some months 
of training at home, went to France early in 1915 
with the 45th Brigade (15th Division). He was killed 
during the Battle of Loos, which began September 25 
and ended September 28, 1915. The exact details of 
his death have not been discovered. 



Lieutenant Alexander Howard Donaldson, 2/9th 
Battn. The Highland Light Infantry (The Glasgow 
Highlanders), was born in November 1895, and was 
at Loretto from 1911 to 1914. Corporal, O.T.C. In 
December 1914 he enlisted as a private in the 9th 
H.L.I., and obtained his commission in the same 
Battalion in January 1915. Promoted Lieutenant in 
July 1915, he served at Maldon, Essex, for nearly a 
year, and was then stationed at the Curragh Camp, 
County Clare, Ireland, for a considerable time. Lieut. 
Donaldson left for France, April 1918, and was killed 
in action on the 12th October of that year. 



B 



18 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Captain Henry Claude Dkummond, 7th Battn. (Terr.) 
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, was born in 
March 1883, came to Loretto in 1896, and left school 
in 1900. A seed merchant at Stirling, he applied for 
a commission shortly after the outbreak of war, was 
gazetted to the A. and S. Highlanders, and proceeded 
to France in May 1915. He was promoted to the 
rank of Captain in January 1916. Captain Drummond 
was killed instantaneously by a shell on July 24, 1916, 
whilst leading his company in a counter-attack. 



Lieutenant Patrick Campbell Drummond, M.C., 7th 
(Service) Battn. King's Own Scottish Borderers, was 
born in November 1887, and was at Loretto from 
1902 to 1905. He played in the School XV. 's of 
1904, 1905. On leaving school he went to Perak in 
the Malay States as a rubber planter. 

Lieut. Drummond obtained a commission in a 
" Service " Battalion of the K.O.S.B.'s and went to 
France early in 1915 with the 9th Division. He was 
killed just east of the village of Lens, with rifle and 
bayonet in hand, during the Battle of Loos, on 
September 26, 1915. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 19 



Major and Brevet - Lieutenant - Colonel William 
Drysdale, D.S.O., The Royal Scots, was born in 
November 1876, and was at Loretto from 1890 to 
1894. XV., XI., and School Prizeman. He entered 
the R.M.C., Sandhurst, in 1894, and was gazetted in 
1896. After some years' service in India he graduated 
at the Staff College. 

At the outbreak of war Col. Drysdale was serving 
as Brigade Major, and was wounded in 1914 at Ypres, 
where he won the D.S.O. In 1915 he was appointed 
G.S.O. (second grade) and given his Brevet of 
Lieutenant- Colonel. Wounded and invalided home 
in July 1916, he returned to France in command of 
the 4th Battn. Leicestershire Regt., and was killed on 
September 29, 1916, at Gueudecourt, during the 
Battle of the Somme. 



Captain Leslie Finlay Dun, 2/ 10th Battn. (Scottish) The 
King's Liverpool Regiment, was born in October 1893, 
and was at Loretto from 1908 to 1912. He was a 
House Prefect and Sergeant in charge of signallers, 
O.T.C. He went up to Trinity Coll., Oxford, and 
was a keen member of the 'Varsity O.T.C. At the 
outbreak of war he enlisted in the Liverpool Scottish 
and went to Flanders in 1914, but was invalided home 
in December of that year. He was then given a 
commission in the 2nd Battn. Liverpool Scottish, 
returned to the front in June 1915, and was promoted 
Captain soon after. Captain Dun was killed by a 
shell on September 27, 1915. 



20 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Lieutenant Henry Holms- Kerr Dunlop, The Royal 
Army Service Corps, was born in November 1886, 
and was at Loretto from 1899 to 1904. He was a 
gifted musician, and also a good athlete. 

In 1916 Lieut. Dunlop was given a commission in 
the Royal Army Service Corps, and joined the British 
Expeditionary Force in Italy, where he served until 
he was taken ill with influenza whilst on service. 
This, unfortunately, persisted until it developed into 
pneumonia, which proved fatal, and Lieut. Dunlop 
died in a Military Hospital on February 13, 1919. 



Lieutenant James Dunsmuir, 2nd Canadian Mounted 
Rifles, a native of British Columbia, was born in 
January 1894, and was at Loretto from 1905 to 1911. 
He was a clever light-weight boxer. 

Lieut. Dunsmuir held a commission in the Canadian 
Mounted Rifles, and in May 1915 he embarked for 
England in the Cunard Liner Lusitania, en route for 
the theatre of war. The Lusitania was torpedoed on 
May 7, 1915, by a German submarine not far from 
the coast of Ireland, and Lieut. Dunsmuir was among 
the very many who were drowned. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 21 



2nd Lieutenant James Ingleby Farmer, 2nd Battn. 
The King's Royal Rifle Corps, was born in January 
1895, and was at Loretto from 1909 to 1913. XI. 
Shooting VIII. Sergeant, O.T.C. Winner of one of 
Mr. Paul's Cups. After leaving school he went up 
to Cambridge (Clare Coll.). In 1914 he obtained a 
commission in the 60th Rifles (K.R.R.C.), and went 
to the 2nd Battalion in France. On May 9, 1915, his 
Battalion made an unsuccessful attack on a German 
trench, and on reassembling found Lieut. Farmer to 
be missing. When this trench was taken later, it was 
found that he had been killed just short of it and in 
the front of the attack. 



2nd Lieutenant Patrick Hamilton Forrester, 8th 
(Service) Battn. The Black Watch (Royal High- 
landers), was born in June 1892, and was at Loretto 
1908 to 1910. In September 1914 he joined the 
Public Schools Battalion as a private, and in April 
1915 was given a commission in the 8th Battn. The 
Black Watch. He went out to France at once. 

Lieut. Forrester was Machine-gun Officer of his 
Battalion, and was mentioned in despatches for his 
work during the Battle of Loos, September 25-28, 
1915. In the course of this battle he was severely 
wounded in the head and arm, and he died of his 
wounds in London, October 11, 1915. 



Lieutenant Geoffrey Fyson, 3rd Battn. The Royal 
Scots, born in October 1884, and at Loretto 1897 to 
1904, was Head of School and Captain of the XV. 
An Exhibitioner of Sidney Sussex Coll., Camb., he 
returned to Loretto as a master after leaving the 
'Varsity. At the outbreak of war he at once joined 
the 3rd Royal Scots as a Lieutenant, but the War 
Office ordered him to return to Loretto and train the 
O.T.C. In December 1916 he was permitted to go 
on active service, was wounded in 1917, and invalided 
home with enteric fever. After some months as 
Instructor to an Officer Cadet Battalion, he went to 
Salonika in August 1918, and was killed when on 
patrol by a bomb, September 4, 1918. 



Oliver Fyson, Private, Canadian Infantry, twin brother 
of Geoffrey Fyson, was born October 1884, and at 
Loretto 1897 to 1904. Prefect and XV. He went 
to Canada, where he captained the British Columbia 
Rugby Team. At the outbreak of war he joined the 
1st Canadian Contingent as a private, went to France 
early in 1915, and was in the trenches before Ypres in 
April, when the Germans, using poison gas for the 
first time, made their second great and unsuccessful 
attempt to break through the Allied lines. He was 
killed north of Ypres on April 22, 1915, when taking 
part in the charge of the Canadians which saved the 
British line. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 23 



Alan James Gardener, Private, Canadian Infantry, was 
born in January 1895, and was at Loretto 1909 to 
1911. He enlisted in Canada, in a Scottish Battalion, 
on August 6, 1914, came to England with the 1st 
Canadian Contingent, and spent the first autumn and 
winter of the war training on Salisbury Plain. He 
went to France on Good Friday 1915, and took part 
in the Second Battle of Ypres, April and May 1915. 
His Battalion then went south to the neighbourhood 
of La Bassee, and Alan Gardener was killed during 
the last phase of the Battle of Festubert, May 20, 1915. 



Lieutenant - Commander Mungo Campbell Gibson, 
R.N.V.R., born May 1890, was at Loretto 1904 to 
1906. When the Forth Division R.N.V.R. was formed 
in 1913 he was given the command. In September 
1914 he was promoted Lieutenant- Commander in the 
" Nelson " Battalion, Royal Naval Division, and with 
it served in the Antwerp Expedition. His Battalion 
went to Gallipoli in April 1915, and during the 
first Battle of Krithia, May 1, 1915, was sent up to 
strengthen the French extreme right, and helped to 
repulse the Turkish attack. On the night of May 2 
the enemy attacked again, and during the fight Lieut. - 
Commdr. Gibson was shot through the head and killed 
instantly. 



Lieutenant Andrew Graham, 9th (Service) Battn. The 
Black Watch, was born in January 1889, and at Loretto 
1905 to 1909. He was in Canada in August 1914, 
but returned home to join the New Armies. Com- 
missioned in the 8th (Service) Battn. The Black 
Watch he saw a lot of active service, including the 
Somme battle of 1916. Invalided home with trench 
fever, he returned to France early in 1917 and was 
posted to the 9th Battn. of his Regiment. On 
December 30, 1917, when he was commanding the 
44th Trench Mortar Battery, he, with several others, 
was killed by a premature burst of one of his own 
shells. 



2nd Lieutenant James Gibson Grant, 10th (Scottish) 
Battn. The King's Liverpool Regt., was born in 
August 1891, and was at Loretto from 1905 to 1908. 
He enlisted in the Liverpool Scottish in 1913, and 
went to France with his Battalion, November 1, 1914. 
In June 1915 he was made Lance- Corporal, and in 
October of that year was given his commission. After 
three years of fighting on the Western front his 
health broke down, and he became so ill that he was 
obliged to resign his commission in November 1917. 
He died of illness caused by hardship and exposure 
on service, February 19, 1919. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 25 



Lieutenant Magnus Nigel Gray, 3rd Reserve (att. 1st) 
Battn. The Cameronians, was born in May 1895, and 
at Loretto 1908 to 1914. Head of School. Captain 
XV. and XI. Company - Sergeant - Major, O.T.C. 
Medals for 100 yards, long jump, and high jump 
(5 ft. 5\ in.). At the outbreak of war he joined the 3rd 
Cameronians and was with them at Nigg until January 
1915, when he joined the 1st Battalion at Armentieres. 
Promoted Lieutenant in February 1915, he was men- 
tioned in despatches for conspicuous bravery in action 
on June 19. On June 20, at 6 p.m., Lieutenant Gray 
was shot through the head by a sniper. He never 
regained consciousness and died in a Field Ambulance 
on June 21, 1915. 



2nd Lieutenant Nicholas Harington Grieve, The 
Royal Scots Fusiliers, was born in January 1897, and 
was at Loretto from 1911 to 1915. Prefect. XV. 
XI. Sergeant, O.T.C. On leaving school he applied 
for a commission, and was gazetted to the Royal 
Scots Fusiliers, being stationed for some time at a 
training camp just outside Edinburgh. 

Lieut. Grieve had not been long with his Battalion 
in France before he was reported " missing ", in 
November 1916. Later he was officially reported 
"' killed in action ", and his grave has been located in 
Serre Road Cemetery, Hebuterne. 



26 ROLL OF HONOUR 



2nd Lieutenant Charles Wilfrid Guthrie, The Royal 
Scots, was born in January 1898, and was at Loretto 
from 1913 to 1916. House Prefect. Corporal, O.T.C. 
Before leaving school he passed his Matriculation at 
Balliol College, Oxford, and was, on leaving, awarded 
a Craigielands Scholarship. He obtained a commis- 
sion in a Battalion of the Royal Scots, and went to 
France in June 1917. On August 1, 1917, his Com- 
pany was surrounded by the enemy, and Lieut. 
Guthrie was the last officer left with it He was 
wounded three times before he was finally shot through 
the head and killed. 



Captain Robert Forman Guthrie, 10th (Scottish) Battn. 
The King's Liverpool Regt., was born in August 
1891, and was at Loretto 1905 to 1910. Head of 
School, Captain XV. and XL, and first Company- 
Sergeant-Major of the School O.T.C. After leaving 
school he went up to Cambridge (King's Coll.) and 
took his degree. 

After the outbreak of the war Capt. Guthrie 
obtained a commission in the Liverpool Scottish, and 
went out to France. On August 9, 1916, when the 
great British offensive from Guillemont to the Somme 
was in progress, he was killed, leading his men to the 
attack, by machine-gun fire, almost on the German 
wire. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 27 



Captain John Fitzgerald Gwynne, M.C., R.A.M.C., 
born in August 1889, was at Loretto 1901 to 1906. 
School Prizeman. He studied medicine at Sheffield 
University. 

Capt. Gwynne obtained a commission in the 
R.A.M.C. and served in Flanders, winning the 
Military Cross. At dawn on July 9, 1915, he was 
told that a wounded man had been lying in an 
exposed, unsafe trench for three days, unattended. 
Though warned of the danger, he made his way to 
the spot and dressed the man's wounds. As he 
straightened himself up after bending over him, a 
sniper shot him through the head and killed him on 
the spot. 



2nd Lieutenant Owen Perrott Gwynne, 92nd Punjabis 
(Indian Army), was born May 1891, and was at 
Loretto 1903 to 1908. Having left school he went 
to Vickers Maxim and Co.'s works as an engineering 
pupil, and in 1913 to Ceylon as Resident Engineer 
on the Dunsinane Tea Plantation. At the outbreak 
of war he joined the Ceylon Planters Rifles and went 
to Egypt. Lieut. Gwynne was given a commission 
in the 92nd Punjabis, and fought at Ismailia. Later 
he went with the Relief Force, under Gen. Sir F. J. 
Aylmer, to the Persian Gulf, and was killed in the 
Battle of Sheikh Saad (on the Tigris), January 6, 7, 
and 8, 1916. 



28 ROLL OF HONOUR 



2nd Lieutenant James Oswald Haldane, The Rifle 
Brigade, was born in May 1879, and was at Loretto 
1892 to 1898. Prefect. School Prizeman. Scholar 
of Jesus Coll., Camb., 1898 to 1903. In 1900, 1901 he 
served in the South African War with the Cambridge 
University Volunteer Company. In 1904 he was 
appointed to the Uganda Civil Service. At the out- 
break of war he was District Commissioner of Toro, 
and resigned this post on obtaining a commission in 
the Rifle Brigade in February 1916. 2nd Lieut. 
Haldane joined the B.E.F. in France and was killed 
in action on August 8, 1916, his death being due to 
an act of chivalrous care for one of his men. 



Major James Dundas Hamilton, 7th Battn. The Royal 
Scots, was born in January 1877, and was at Loretto 
1883 to 1893. School Prizeman. He entered business 
as a Stockbroker and became a very keen Volunteer. 
He served for many years in the Volunteer and 
Territorial Forces, and was gazetted Major in 1910. 
His Battalion, after some months' service at home, 
during the early days of the war, were under orders 
for service overseas, and travelled south from Scotland 
by the troop train which was wrecked at Gretna on 
May 22, 1915. Major Hamilton was among those 
killed. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 29 



Lieutenant Norman Hargreaves, East Lancashire Regt. 
and R.F.C., was born in May 1894, and was at Loretto 
from 1909 to 1912. Soon after hostilities had com- 
menced he obtained a commission in a Territorial 
Battalion of the East Lanes. Regt., went out to 
Gallipoli, and was invalided home with enteric. He 
was, on recovery, transferred to the R.F.C., and went 
to France in November 1916. On November 23, 
1916, when on his first patrol, he successfully fought 
an enemy 'plane, but later in the day his machine 
got out of control during a flight and fell to the 
ground, and Lieut. Hargreaves was killed. 



Lieutenant (acting Captain) Edward Harris, M.C., 
R.G.A., born in May 1887, was at Loretto 1897 to 
1906, and in the Cricket XI. A Territorial before the 
war, he was a Lieutenant in the Northumberland 
R.G.A. His Battery went to Flanders on April 15, 
1915, and took part in the Second Battle of Ypres. 

Capt. Harris served almost continuously in Flan- 
ders, and was a Liaison Officer between the Artillery 
and the Flying Corps. On April 25, 1918, he received 
an abdominal wound, which did not at first appear 
mortal, but he died the same day at a Casualty 
Clearing Station. 



30 ROLL OF HONOUR 



2nd Lieutenant Charles Stuart Hedderwick. 2nd 
Battn. The Royal Scots, was born November 1889, 
and was at Loretto 1904 to 1908. He went to France 
with Headquarters 4th Army Corps as a motor 
cyclist in October 1914, and in November was given 
a Temporary Commission in the 2nd Royal Scots, 
3rd Division, B.E.F. 

At about 11.15 p.m., February 28, 1915, a bright, 
moon -lit night, Lieut. Hedderwick's platoon was 
being relieved in the trenches. The Germans were 
only 100 yards away, and several of his men were 
wounded as they left the trench. He did not march 
off with his platoon, but stayed to assist his wounded, 
lying exposed to fire. Whilst thus engaged he was 
shot through the head, and killed instantly. 



2nd Lieutenant James Hemingway, 3rd Reserve (att. 
1st) Battn. Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs), 
was born in August 1893, and was at Loretto from 
1907 to 1913. Head of School. Captain XV. Com- 
pany-Sergeant-Major, O.T.C. He went up to Trinity 
Coll., Oxford, where he played in his College XV. and 
made his mark as a " fresher ". At the outbreak of 
war he was gazetted to the 3rd Seaforths, and was 
sent out to the 1st Battalion in France. At 5.10 a.m. 
on May 9, 1915, the Battalion attacked the German 
trenches near Neuve Chapelle, and Lieut. Hemingway 
fell, leading his platoon, close to " Port Arthur " on 
the road leading to La Bassee. 



Captain Eric Hume Henderson, 2nd Royal Munster 
Fusiliers, was born in July 1881, and at Loretto 1891 
to 1895. After leaving school he entered the Army 
and was gazetted to the Munster Fusiliers, who, in 
1915, formed part of the Fusilier Brigade, Dardanelles 
Expeditionary Force. At the Great Landing, April 
25, 1915, the Munsters were told off to " V Beach ". 
Capt. Henderson was the first officer to land, and 
early in the day his arm was shattered. He fought 
on, but was again wounded, in the side, and removed 
to hospital. He died of these wounds at Alexandria 
on May 20, 1915. For his conduct at V Beach 
Capt. Henderson was mentioned in despatches. 



2nd Lieutenant Thomas Adam Henderson, The Gordon 
Highlanders (Terr.), was born in April 1889, and was 
at Loretto from 1902 to 1908. 

Lieut. Henderson joined the Territorial Army, and 
his Battalion (Gordon Highlanders) took part in the 
Battle of Loos on September 25, 26, and 27, 1915. 
After the battle 2nd Lieut. Henderson was reported 
' missing ", and was later reported " killed at Loos 
on the 27th September 1915 ". 



32 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Captain William Alexander Henderson, 1st Battn. 
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, was born in 
December 1876, was at Loretto 1891 to 1894, and 
afterwards went to St. Andrews University, and later 
to Oriel Coll., Oxon. He was a keen cricketer and an 
exceptionally fine golfer. At Muirfield he defeated 
Jerome Travers, the American Amateur Champion, 
in the championship meeting of 1909. Gazetted to 
the 1st A. and S. Highlanders in February 1900, he 
served with them in South Africa. He was killed 
during a night attack on a German trench in Ploeg- 
steert Wood on November 10, 1914. His body was 
not recovered until December 26, 1914, during the 
unofficial Christmas Truce. 



Captain Harold Sinclair Higgin, 75th Carnatic In- 
fantry (Indian Army), was born in July 1889, and was 
at Loretto from 1903 to 1907. In 1914 he joined the 
Army in India and was posted to the 80th Carnatic 
Infantry, serving with them in Peshawar, Delhi, 
Bhamo, Ceylon, Madras, and Basra. In 1916 he was 
promoted Captain in the 75th Carnatic Infantry and 
served for two years at Aden. 

Capt. Higgin died on service at Bombay, January 
11, 1919. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 33 



2nd Lieutenant Gerald Broughton Hopkins, 7/8th 
Battn. King's Own Scottish Borderers, was born in 
May 1884, and was at Loretto 1894 to 1904. Head of 
School and Captain of the XV. A business man, 
residing at Cardross, he applied for a commission at 
the outbreak of the war, and was gazetted to the 7/ 8th 
Battn. K.O.S.B. Near Loos, on September 17, 1918, 
his Battalion was attacking the enemy trenches, and 
Lieut. Hopkins, although wounded in the hand, per- 
sisted in rallying and leading his men forward under 
a heavy machine-gun fire. Just short of their final 
objective he was again hit, this time in the head, and 
killed on the spot. 



2nd Lieutenant Thomas Wardlaw Horne, The Sea- 
forth Highlanders, was born in May 1886, and was at 
Loretto from 1896 to 1898, when he went to Harrow. 
At the outbreak of war he was planting rubber in 
Ceylon, and volunteered for service with the Ceylon 
Planters Rifles. He went with them to Egypt, and 
was present at the attack on the Suez Canal. In 
April 1915 he landed at Anzac Cove in Gallipoli, and 
was severely wounded there in August of that year 
and invalided home. He was given a commission in 
the Seaforths, returned to the front, was reported 
missing on August 22, 1917, and later reported killed 
on that date. 



34 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Captain Robert Raimes Jackson, M.C., R.F.A., was 
born in January 1893, and was at Loretto 1908 to 
1912. Prefect. XV. Captain XI. Sergeant, O.T.C. 
Later he played for the Liverpool and Lancashire 
County XV. 's. He was commissioned in the 4th 
(Reserve) Battn. The King's Liverpool Regiment at 
the outbreak of war, but was early wounded in the 
foot and permanently injured, so transferred later to 
the R.F.A. 

Capt. Jackson was wounded in the first, second, and 
third years of the war, and won the Military Cross. 
He had only just recovered from the third wound and 
resumed duty when he was hit by a piece of shell, on 
October 31, 1917, whilst in command of his Battery, 
and died on November 1. 

Captain John Prior Jamieson, 3rd (att. 1st) Battn. The 
King's Own (Royal Lancaster) Regiment, born in 
September 1890, was at Loretto 1905 to 1908. After 
leaving school he joined the Special Reserve and was 
gazetted to the 3rd K.O. (R.L.) Regt. in 1910. He 
went to Flanders in August 1914 with the 1st Battalion 
of his Regiment (4th Div. B.E.F.) and was wounded 
on the Aisne, rejoining the Battalion on recovery. 

During the Third Battle of Ypres a big allied 
attack was made between the Ypres — Roulers Railway 
and Houthulst Forest on October 12, 1917. Captain 
Jamieson, who took part in it, was wounded near 
Poelcappelle, and died of his wounds on October 13, 
1917. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 35 



Lieutenant Graham Johns, The Scots Guards, was born 
in October 1897, and was at Loretto (Junior School) 
from 1910 to 1912. From thence he went to Chelten- 
ham College. On leaving school he matriculated at 
Caius College, Cambridge. 

During an action at Ypres in 1917 Lieut. Johns 
was severely wounded. He was sent back to England, 
and was hors de combat until March 1918, when he 
returned to the front. He was killed in action on 
September 27, 1918. 



Captain John Sutcliffe Jowett, l/5th Battn. (Terr.) The 
Manchester Regiment, was born in March 1894, and 
was at Loretto from 1908 to 1913. He was a Sergeant 
in the School O.T.C. When war broke out he was 
given a commission in a Territorial Battalion of the 
Manchester Regiment, and went out to Gallipoli in 
October 1915, where he served with the East Lanca- 
shire Division. 

After the evacuation of the Peninsula, Capt. 
Jowett served with the British Expeditionary Force 
in France. He was wounded very severely on August 
18, 1918, and died of his wounds at Le Treport 
Hospital on September 22, 1918. 



36 ROLL OF HONOUR 



2nd Lieutenant William Hall Jowett, The King's 
Liverpool Regiment, was born in March 1894, and 
was at Loretto from 1908 to 1912. He served for 
nearly three years in the School O.T.C. At the 
outbreak of war he applied for a commission and was 
gazetted to a Battalion of the King's Liverpool Regt. 
Lieut. Jowett was very severely wounded in action, 
and he died from the effects of his wounds — in 
hospital — on June 28, 1916. His twin brother, 
Capt. J. S. Jowett, of the Manchester Regiment, 
also died of wounds in September 1918. 



2nd Lieutenant Richard Henry Kember, M.M., New 
Zealand Expeditionary Force, was born in April 1894, 
and was at Loretto from 1909 to 1912. Corporal, 
O.T.C. In New Zealand, in August 1914, he enlisted 
as a private and came to the Mediterranean early in 
1915 with the N.Z.E.F. During the campaign in 
Gallipoli he was wounded, and his bravery won him 
the Military Medal. On recovering from his wound 
he was given a commission, and after the evacuation 
of Gallipoli he went with the Anzacs to the Western 
front, where he was killed in action on September 22, 
1916. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 37 



William Yorke Keys- Wells, Indian Army Cadet, was 
born in May 1898, and was at Loretto from 1912 to 
1915. Corporal Signaller, O.T.C. Although only 
sixteen years of age when war broke out, he deter- 
mined to get a commission as soon as possible, and 
entered for the Army Entrance Examination (for an 
Indian Cadetship), which he passed in July 1915, when 
just over seventeen years old. William Keys-Wells 
sailed for India in September, and died on service 
at sea, September 25, 1915, the news of his death 
being received from Gibraltar. 



2nd Lieutenant John Darg Laing, R.F.C., was born in 
December 1898, and was at Loretto from 1907 to 
1916. Prefect. XV. XL Sergeant, O.T.C. He was 
also an exceptionally fine golfer. From Loretto he 
passed into the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, 
but, having accidentally injured his knee whilst there, 
was invalided from the Academy and classed as 
" unfit for general service ". With some difficulty he 
managed to get a commission in the Flying Corps, 
but had only been on service a short time in France 
when he was killed in an aerial fight on October 24, 
1917. 



38 ROLL OF HONOUR 



2nd Lieutenant Thomas Lamb, 3/4th (Terr.) Battn. The 
King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, was born in 
April 1896, and was at Loretto 1910 to 1914. Cor- 
poral, O.T.C. In 1914 he went up to Oriel Coll., 
Oxford, but very shortly left the 'Varsity to take a 
commission in the Yorkshire Light Infantry. On 
June 30, 1916, at Clipstone Camp (Notts), during 
bombing practice, a private under his command threw 
a grenade which hit the parapet and fell back amongst 
his section. Lieut. Lamb picked it up to throw it 
out of the trench, but it burst in his hands, wounding 
him mortally. He died in a few minutes. 



Captain John Lang, Adjutant and Quartermaster Scottish 
Command School of Musketry, was born in 1849, and 
was at Loretto 1864 to 1866. He played in the XV. 
and XL In business in England, California, Ceylon, 
and Australia, for more than twenty years, he was also 
well known as an author. At the outbreak of war he 
applied for a commission, although sixty-five years of 
age, and was appointed to the Staff of the Scottish 
Command School of Musketry at Barry Camp. He 
died on April 15, 1917, of an illness contracted on 
service, brought on by hard work and exposure. 
Capt. Lang was the younger brother of Andrew 
Lang, the historian and writer. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 39 



Captain Cyril Murgatroyd Longbotham, 2nd Battn. 
The Leicestershire Regiment, was born July 1887, and 
came to Loretto in 1900, leaving in 1903. He joined 
the 3rd (Militia) Battn. West Riding Regt., passed 
the Army Examination in 1908, and was gazetted to 
the 2nd Leicestershires. 

Capt. Longbotham served with his Battalion — a 
unit of the Meerut Division, 1st Indian Expeditionary 
Force — in France and in Mesopotamia, and died at 
Montana, Switzerland, from illness contracted on 
active service, on January 12, 1920. 



2nd Lieutenant James Francis Ronaldson Lyell, The 
Royal Scots, was born in March 1894, and was at 
Loretto from 1909 to 1911. XV. He joined a 
' Service " Battalion of the Royal Scots, went with 
them to France, and became their Intelligence Officer. 
On November 24, 1917, his Battalion came out of 
trenches and went into billets. Lieut. Lyell, who 
lived at Battalion Headquarters, was by himself in 
the billet when an explosion was heard — probably the 
" delayed " explosion of a " dud " shell which had 
lodged in the wall or below the floor (as often 
happened) — and Lieut. Lyell was found there, killed 
by splinters of a shell. This occurred on November 
25, 1917. 



40 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Captain Lynedoch Archibald Mackenzie, East Lanca- 
shire Royal Engineers (Terr.), born November 1884, 
and at Loretto 1897 to 1903, was a B.Sc. of Edin- 
burgh University and an A.M.I.C.E. He played for 
five years in the Scottish International Hockey XI., 
and was, for some time, a member of the " Queen's 
Edinburgh " (4/ 5th Royal Scots), but in 1912 he 
joined the 1st Field Co., East Lanes R.E., which 
sailed for Egypt with the East Lanes Terr. Division 
in 1914, and landed in Gallipoli May 1915. 

Capt. Mackenzie was twice wounded there, and 
died of his wounds on a hospital ship on October 19, 
1915. 



Lieutenant Royal M'Laren, The Cheshire Regiment, 
was born in June 1882, and was at Loretto from 1894 
to 1900. He served throughout the South African 
campaign. 

In April 1915 Lieutenant M'Laren obtained a 
commission, and was gazetted to the Cheshire Regi- 
ment. He was killed in action in July 1916 during 
the Battle of the Somme. 



Captain Reginald William MacLuckie, 3rd (Reserve) 
Battn. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (The 
Stirlingshire Militia), was born in March 1878, and 
was at Loretto from 1892 to 1895. He took his 
B.Sc. degree at Edinburgh University, and afterwards 
he went to the Cape as a Civil Engineer. At the 
outbreak of war he returned to Scotland and obtained 
a commission in the 3rd A. and S. Highlanders in 
March 1915. 

Capt. MacLuckie joined a Battalion of his Regiment 
in France and became Brigade Bombing Officer, being 
given later the command of a Trench Mortar Battery. 
He was killed in France on August 8, 1916. 



2nd Lieutenant Hamish Ian M'Naughton, R.F.A., 
was born in May 1888, and was at Loretto 1904 to 
1908. Prefect. XV. After leaving school he went 
to the Argentine, and at the outbreak of war was 
working on a ranch. He returned to England as 
soon as he could be relieved of his duties, obtained a 
commission in the R.F.A. and, after a period of 
training, went to France early in September 1915. 
After some time in France he was transferred to the 
Eastern front, where he was killed on April 24, 1917. 
Lieut. M'Naughton had been twice recommended 
for a decoration. 



42 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Captain Norman George M'Naughton, M.C., R.A.F., 
was born in May 1890, and was at Loretto from 1904 
to 1909. Prefect. XV. After leaving school he 
went to the Argentine, and when war broke out 
returned to England and joined the Royal Air Force. 
He was commissioned July 21, 1915, and was given 
his " wings " on December 1, 1915. Wounded early 
in 1916 he was awarded the Military Cross in May 
1917. 

Captain M'Naughton was reported as " missing " 
on June 24, 1917, and a later casualty list presumed 
him to have been killed on that date. 



Lieutenant Nigel Lorne M'Neill, 3rd (Reserve) Battn. 
The Gordon Highlanders, was born in August 1894, 
and was at Loretto from 1908 to 1913. House 
Prefect. Cricket XI. Sergeant, O.T.C. At the 
School Sports in 1913 he won a medal for the high 
jump, clearing 5 feet 4 inches. At the outbreak of 
war he obtained a commission in the 3rd Gordons. 

During the Battle of the Somme, in July 1916, 
Lieut. M'Neill was shot through the head whilst 
leading his platoon in the attack, 20 yards from the 
German position. Death was instantaneous. 



2nd Lieutenant William Nore Malcolm, Royal En- 
gineers, was born in December 1888, and was at 
Loretto from 1897 to 1905. On leaving school he 
became a Pioneer Surveyor on the Canadian Pacific 
Railway, but in August 1914 threw up his appoint- 
ment and came home to enlist. He was, however, 
given a Temporary 2nd Lieutenancy in the Royal 
Engineers. 

Early in 1915 Lieut. Malcolm went out to Malta 
with his Field Company, and in May 1915 was 
selected for duty at Gallipoli with the Dardanelles 
Expeditionary Force. Soon after landing he was 
severely wounded and sent back to Malta, where he 
died of his wounds on June 12, 1915. 



Captain Stanley Gemmell Millar, 8th (Service) Battn. 
The Loyal Regiment (North Lancashire), was born 
in February 1887, and was at Loretto 1899 to 1906. 
Prefect. XV. XL After leaving school he played 
in the West of Scotland Cricket XL, and was a 
member of the Scottish International Hockey Team. 
At the outbreak of war he enlisted in a Territorial 
unit and served in the Battalion Machine-gun Section. 
He was afterwards given a commission in The Loyal 
Regiment, and attained the rank of Captain. 

Capt. Millar was killed in action on July 2, 1916, 
during the Battle of the Somme. 



44 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Stewart Wright Millar, Cadet, Royal Flying Corps, 
was born in March 1899, and was at Loretto from 
1913 to 1917. Prefect. XV. Sergeant Signaller, 
O.T.C. Editor of the Lorettonian. 

In April 1917, a few days after he had left Loretto, 
Stewart Millar was accepted for the Royal Flying 
Corps, and began his training at once at the Flying 
School at Farnborough, Hants, as a Cadet. Whilst 
at Farnborough he contracted pneumonia, and died in 
the Cambridge Hospital, Aldershot, on May 24, 1917. 



Lieutenant George Mitchell, 3rd Reserve (att. 1st) 
Battn. The Black Watch, was born in June 1889, and 
at Loretto from 1903 to 1906. He held the Heavy- 
weight Wrestling and Boxing Championships of the 
English Northern Counties, and fought Carpentier 
in Paris, and although severely punished, put up a 
better fight against him than any other British 
representative had done. Enlisting in a Public 
Schools Battalion (Middlesex Regt.) at the outbreak 
of war, he was, on February 10, 1915, given a com- 
mission in the Black Watch. 

Lieut. Mitchell joined the 1st Battalion in France, 
and acted as Battalion Bombing Officer and Brigade 
Trench Mortar Officer. He was killed near Bethune 
on July 22, 1916. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 45 



2nd Lieutenant Douglas Rutherford Morison, 3rd 
(att. 2nd) Battn. The Wiltshire Regiment, was born 
in January 1885, and was at Loretto 1897 to 1904. 
Prefect and XV. He went up to Clare College, 
Cambridge, and was subsequently in business in India, 
then in Canada. When the war broke out he came 
home, went to Cambridge, and trained with the 
'Varsity O.T.C. A commission was given him in 
the 3rd (S.R.) Battn. The Wiltshire Regt., and he 
proceeded to France early in 1915 to join the 2nd 
Battalion. He was killed at the head of his platoon 
on March 12, 1915. 



Major James Maidmont Morrison, 5th (Reserve) Battn. 
Royal Irish Rifles (The South Down Militia), was 
born in March 1870, and was at Loretto from 1885 to 
1887. On leaving school he joined the 5th Royal 
Irish Rifles, and obtained his Captaincy in 1893. 
He served with his Battalion throughout the South 
African campaign of 1899-1902. 

During the Great War Major Morrison served 
with the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, and 
was badly wounded in Gallipoli. He was taken to 
hospital in Alexandria, and died there on July 28, 
1915, from pneumonia, following wounds and exposure 
on the battlefield. 



46 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Captain Percy Lionel Moubray, 3rd (att. 1st) Battn. 
The Black Watch, was born in August 1872, and at 
Loretto 1884 to 1890. He entered the Black Watch 
in 1899 and served in South Africa, being captured 
by the enemy in 1900, and shortly afterwards released. 
On the outbreak of war Capt. Moubray was posted 
to the 1st Battalion, forming part of the 1st Infantry 
Brigade of the 1st Division B.E.F., which late in 
October 1914 was holding a line N.E. of Hooge. 
Here, on the morning of October 29, his Company, 
attacked by vastly superior forces, was practically 
wiped out, and Capt. Moubray was shot dead where 
he stood in the trench. 



Captain Charles James Carlton Mowat, 8th (Terr.) 
Battn. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), was born 
in February 1885, and was at Loretto from 1895 to 
1903. He went to Trinity Coll., Oxford, and after- 
wards became a member of the Glasgow Stock 
Exchange. He joined the 8th Battn. Scottish Rifles, 
but resigned his commission before the war. In 
August 1914 he was reappointed 2nd Lieutenant in 
his old Battalion, and was promoted Captain in 
September. In April 1915 he went to Gallipoli with 
the 156th Brigade, 52nd (Lowland) Division. After 
the Battle of Gully Ravine, June 28, 1915, he was 
" missing ", and later reported " killed ". 



ROLL OF HONOUR 47 



Captain Richard le Brun Nicholson, M.C., 11th 
(Service) Battn. The Cheshire Regiment, was born in 
August 1895, and at Loretto 1909 to 1914. Prefect. 
XV. Sergeant, O.T.C. On September 7, 1914, he 
enlisted in the Middlesex Regt., and on September 29 
was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the Cheshire Regt., 
obtaining his Captaincy in July 1915. He saw a 
great deal of fighting, and won the Military Cross in 
August 1917 for " conspicuous gallantry ". In July 
1918 he was given a Bar to his Cross for " showing 
powers of command of a high order " in an engage- 
ment where he held on to his position in face of very 
superior forces, and when ordered to leave it, with- 
drew his Company intact. 

Captain Nicholson was killed by a shell, August 31, 
1918. 



R. P. Nimmo, Private, The King's (Liverpool) Regiment, 
was born in June 1885, and came to Loretto in 1900. 
At the outbreak of war he was offered a commission, 
but, preferring to serve in the ranks, he enlisted in 
the King's (Liverpool) Regiment. 

During the Somme battle, in July 1916, Private 
Nimmo was in a dug-out with five other men, when 
a shell penetrated it, bursting inside. Five of the six 
men were killed outright, one of whom was R. P. 
Nimmo. 



48 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Captain Arthur Roxburgh Orr, 2nd Battn. The Scots 
Guards, was born in December 1884, and was at 
Loretto from 1897 to 1901. From school he went 
to the Royal Military College at Sandhurst, and, on 
passing out, was gazetted in 1904 to the Scots Guards. 
At the outbreak of war he held the appointment of 
Assistant Superintendent of Gymnasia, London Dis- 
trict. He was wounded in France in October 1914, 
was invalided home, and promoted Captain in Decem- 
ber. Returning to the front in the following spring, 
Captain Orr was killed in October 1915. 



Captain John Arthur Orr, 1st Queen's Own Cameron 
Highlanders, was born in January 1879, and at Loretto 
1892 to 1897. XV. and XL In 1899 he received a 
commission in the Manchester Regiment, transferring 
a few months later to the Camerons. He served in 
South Africa and was mentioned in despatches. 

When war broke out Capt. Orr was a student at 
the Staff College, and after eight weeks of embarka- 
tion duty at Southampton he rejoined his Battalion 
in Flanders on September 26, 1914. He was officially 
reported missing on October 22 of that year, and 
later reported killed near Langemarck on the same 
date. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 49 



Captain Roland Gasker Palmer, 2nd Battn. South 
Wales Borderers, was born in August 1876, at Loretto 
1887 to 1892, and a School Prizeman. He entered the 
R.M. Coll., Sandhurst, in 1895, where he captained 
the Association XI. He was gazetted to the 2nd 
South Wales Borderers and served with them in South 
Africa. Promoted Captain in the 5th Fusiliers in 
1902, he rejoined his old Regiment in 1907, which 
at the outbreak of war was serving abroad. It was 
brought home and incorporated in the 29th Division, 
Dardanelles Expeditionary Force. 

Captain Palmer was killed on April 25, 1915, at 
' Beach S " (Morto Bay), during the Great Landing 
in Gallipoli. 



Lieutenant Thomas Simpson Paterson, Lanes and 
Cheshire R.G.A., was born in July 1890, and was at 
Loretto 1899 to 1909. Prefect. XV. XL After 
leaving school he entered an architect's office, and in 
1913 he went into his father's firm in Liverpool as an 
Estate Agent. He had been a member of the local 
Territorial Artillery Brigade prior to August 1914, 
and on the outbreak of war was mobilised with his 
Battery of the Lanes and Cheshire R.G.A. and went 
on active service with them. 

On November 10, 1916, a shell burst in the Battery 
Officers' Mess dug-out, which killed Lieut. Paterson 
instantaneously. The Battery was at Guillemont at 
the time. 



50 ROLL OF HONOUR 



2nd Lieutenant Ashley Peters, 13th (Service) Battn. 
The East Yorkshire Regiment, was born in May 1897, 
and was at Loretto from 1912 to 1914. Corporal, 
O.T.C. After leaving school he worked at Man- 
chester University, being unable to serve owing to 
severe neuritis, from which he had suffered much 
whilst still at Loretto. Recovering sufficiently to 
apply for a commission, he was gazetted to the East 
Yorks Regt., and went out to France in October 1916. 
Lieut. Peters was killed at Serre by machine-gun 
fire on November 13, 1916, within a month of the 
death of his twin brother, Henry. 



2nd Lieutenant Henry Peters, 26th (Service) Battn. 
The Manchester Regiment, was born in May 1897, 
and was at Loretto from 1912 to 1915. House 
Prefect. XV. Standard Medal, Sports. Corporal, 
O.T.C. He was to have returned to Loretto as a 
Prefect in September 1915, but feeling that he ought 
to join the Army he left school in July 1915, applied 
for a commission, and was gazetted to the Manchester 
Regiment. 

Lieut. Peters fell in action in France on October 
12, 1916, just a month before his twin brother, 
Ashley, was killed. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 51 



Captain Ivor Douglas Philips, The Cheshire Regiment, 
was born in June 1882, and was at Loretto from 
1894 to 1900. After leaving school he joined the 
3rd (Militia) Battn. The Black Watch, and served in 
the South African Campaign. 

When war broke out Captain (then Lieut.) Philips 
rejoined the Army, which he had left some time 
before, and was given a Captaincy in the Cheshire 
Regiment. He died in March 1915 of pneumonia, 
which he had contracted on service. 



2nd Lieutenant Leonard Maurice Powell, 3rd 
Reserve (att. 1st) Battn. The Gordon Highlanders, 
was born in August 1894, and was at Loretto from 
1908 to 1913. House Prefect. XV. XL Sergeant, 
O.T.C. On leaving school he went up to Cam- 
bridge (Caius Coll.) and played in the Freshers' and 
Seniors' Trial Matches (Cricket). 

On the outbreak of war Lieut. Powell joined the 
Public Schools Battalion, but in December 1914 was 
gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the 3rd Gordons. In 
May 1915 he joined the 1st Battalion in Flanders 
(8th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Div.), near Hooge, in the 
Ypres Salient, where he was killed by a shrapnel shell 
on June 18, 1915. 






52 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Captain Philip Bernard Prothero, Argyll and Suther- 
land Highlanders and R.F.C., was born in January 
1894, and was at Loretto from 1909 to 1913. Prefect. 
XV. Captain Shooting VIII. and Company-Sergt.- 
Major, School O.T.C. When war broke out he 
joined the Reserve Battn. A. and S. Highlanders, 
and was attached to the 2nd Battalion (19th Infantry 
Brigade, B.E.F.) in France. At the Battle of Neuve 
Chapelle, early in March 1915, he was wounded, and 
was for some time hors de combat. On recovery he 
joined the R.F.C. 

On July 26, 1917, when Capt. Prothero was leading 
his patrol over the German lines at a great height, he 
was shot down and killed. 



2nd Lieutenant James Wilson MacTurk Rainie, 2nd 
Battn. The Royal Scots, was born in November 1896, 
and was at Loretto from 1908 to 1915. Musical 
Scholar. Prefect. XV. Sergeant, O.T.C. On leaving 
school he was given a nomination to the Royal Mili- 
tary College, and he went to Sandhurst in May 1915, 
where he became a Cadet-Sergeant. 

Gazetted to the Royal Scots, Lieut. Rainie was 
posted to the 2nd Battalion in Flanders. On March 
30, 1916, he and several others of his Battalion were 
making their way up to the front-line trenches at 
St. Eloi, under a heavy shell fire, when he was struck 
by a splinter and killed. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 53 



Captain Hugo Archibald Renwick, R.A.F., was born 
December 1890, and was at Loretto 1903 to 1909. 
After leaving school he went up to Pembroke College, 
Cambridge, and later he served in Yarrow and Co.'s 
shipbuilding yard. At the outbreak of war he was 
given a commission in a Battalion of the South 
Wales Borderers, went to France in July 1915, and 
was severely wounded in the following October. 
He was afterwards appointed to the Experimental 
Department Royal Aircraft Factory. 

On August 18, 1918, Capt. Renwick was acting as 
observer in an experimental flight at Farnborough, 
when he and his pilot met with an accident and were 
both killed. 



Lieutenant Thomas Buchanan Renwick, 6th (Reserve) 
Battn. The Rifle Brigade, was born July 1892, and at 
Loretto 1903 to 1912. Head of School. Captain XV. 
Semi-final Heavy-weight Boxing, Aldershot. Com- 
pany-Sergt.-Major, O.T.C. King's Coll., Camb., Uni- 
versity Gym. Team ; played in 'Varsity XV. on tour. 
He was a Lieutenant in the Camb. Univ. O.T.C, 
and in August 1914 was given a commission in the 
6th Rifle Brigade, but was sent out to join the 3rd 
(Regular) Battn. Middlesex Regiment, 85th Infantry 
Brigade, which greatly distinguished itself during the 
Second Battle of Ypres — from April 23 to May 12, 
1915. Whilst serving with them, and during the 
fiercest fighting round Ypres, Lieutenant Renwick 
was killed, together with several of his brother-officers, 
on April 29, 1915. 



54 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Captain Maxwell Alexander Robertson, 10th (Ser- 
vice) Battn. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, was born in 
October 1874, and was at Loretto 1889 to 1894. 
Prefect. XV. On going up to Oxford (Trinity Coll.) 
he got his Rugby Blue his first term, and played for 
two years in the 'Varsity XV. He took his degree 
with honours in 1897, and was called to the Bar in 
1899. At the outbreak of war he joined the 10th 
Battn. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, obtaining his 
Captaincy in 1915. 

During the Battle of the Somme Captain Robert- 
son was reported wounded and missing on July 1, 
1916, and later was reported killed on that date. 



Sub-Lieutenant John Pitcairn Robley, "Nelson" Bat- 
talion, Royal Naval Division, was born in December 
1895, and was at Loretto from 1909 to 1913. Corporal 
in the School O.T.C. At the outbreak of war he 
joined the Royal Naval Division and was posted to 
the "Nelson" Battalion, with whom he trained at 
Blandford. In March 1915 he went with his Battalion 
to Egypt, and landed with them in Gallipoli in May 
1915. 

On the night of June 5, 1915, Sub-Lieut. Robley 
was firing from a trench at the flashes of Turkish 
rifles. He stood upright to allow some troops to pass 
him in the trench and was shot through the head by 
a sniper. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 55 



2nd Lieutenant Cecil Rhodes Goodall Ross, M.C., 
15th (Service) Battn. The Royal Scots (att. 45th 
Trench Mortar Battery), was born February 1897, 
and was at Loretto 1907 to 1916. Head of School. 
Captain XV. XI. Captain Shooting VIII. C.S.M., 
O.T.C. He matriculated at Trinity College, Oxford, 
but on leaving school he applied for and obtained a 
commission in the Royal Scots. In France he was 
attached to the 45th T.M.B., and was in charge of 
the Royal Scots section of the Battery. For " bravery 
and brilliant leadership " on April 9, 1917, he was 
awarded the Military Cross. 

Lieut. Ross was killed in action at Monchy, near 
Arras, on April 23, 1917. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Hugh Alexander Ross, D.S.O., 
1st Gordons, was born February 1881, and at Loretto 
1893 to 1900, where he was Head of School, in the 
XI., and Captain of the XV. In 1900 he received 
a " Loretto ' : commission in the Gordons, serving 
with their M.I. Company in the South African War. 
Adjutant of the 3rd Battalion in 1914, he went to 
Flanders with the 8th Gordons. He was wounded 
at Loos in September 1915, and awarded the D.S.O. 
in November 1915. The following year he was given 
command of a West Yorkshire Battalion, was men- 
tioned three times in despatches, and given the Order 
of Danilo. In 1918 he commanded the 2nd Gordons 
in Italy, and was killed by a shell at the passage of 
the Piave, October 27, 1918. 



56 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Captain Ian Edgar Ross, 4th (att. 1st) Battn. The King's 
Liverpool Regiment, was born in October 1892, and 
at Loretto 1902 to 1911. House Prefect. XV. XI. 
After leaving school he entered the firm of J. B. 
Arkle and Co., Liverpool. A keen footballer, he 
played for Liverpool and Lancashire, and was reserve 
for the Scottish XV. In August 1914 he was com- 
missioned in the 4th Liverpool Regiment, joined the 
1st Battalion in France, and fought in the engage- 
ments at Neuve Chapelle, Ypres (second battle), Rue 
du Bois, and Festubert. On December 18, 1915, he 
received his Captaincy. 

On April 25, 1916, Capt. Ross was wounded by 
the bursting of a trench bomb and died in hospital a 
few hours later. 



Captain Alexander Christopher Russell, 11th (Ser- 
vice) Battn. The Sherwood Foresters, was born in 
July 1889, and was at Loretto from 1901 to 1905. 
After leaving school he went through the engineering 
works of Sir W. Arrol at Glasgow, and when war 
broke out he was in motor works at Leeds. He 
enlisted in the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire 
Light Infantry and soon became a non-commissioned 
officer. In October 1914 he was given a commission 
in the 11th Sherwood Foresters, and was promoted 
Captain in April 1915. 

Captain Russell was killed in action in France on 
October 10, 1915. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 57 



Captain Charles Russell, Indian Army Reserve of 
Officers, born July 1872, was at Loretto 1885 to 1892. 
A scholar of Hertford College, Oxon., he took first- 
class honours in " Greats ", entered the Education 
Service of India, and became Principal of Bankepore 
College. On leave at the outbreak of war he joined 
a Sportsman's Battalion, was commissioned in the 
East Yorks Regiment, and later was attached to a 
Battalion of Gurkha Rifles in Palestine. He was 
killed on November 22, 1917, at Nebi Samwil (the 
tomb of the Prophet Samuel), a mosque five miles 
N.W. of Jerusalem, during a very heavy attack by 
strongly reinforced Turkish forces. 



Trooper John Robson Scott, Lothians and Border 
Horse Yeomanry Regiment (since converted into the 
19th Armoured Car Company, Tank Corps), was born 
in May 1895, and was at Loretto from 1909 to 1913. 
When war broke out he joined the Lothians and 
Border Horse, and is stated to have been the best 
rider and best shot in his squadron. 

John Robson Scott fell ill whilst on service with 
his Regiment, and after a very long and painful illness 
he died of pneumonia in a nursing home in Edinburgh 
on October 15, 1915. 



58 ROLL OF HONOUR 



2nd Lieutenant John Mill Sellar, 7th (Service) Battn. 
King's Own Scottish Borderers, was born in June 
1892, and was at Loretto from 1908 to 1911. House 
Prefect. XV. At the outbreak of war he joined the 
New Armies and was gazetted to the 7th K.O.S.B., 
crossing to France with the 9th Division early in 
1915. His Battalion took part in the Battle of Loos, 
September 26-28, 1915. 

On September 26, during the first attack, Lieut. 
Sellar, who was some way in front of his men, had 
passed the first enemy trench, when he was shot from 
behind, and died in a few seconds. 



Captain Eric Francis Sellars, M.C., 12th (Service) 
Battn. The Cheshire Regiment, was born in October 
1893, and was at Loretto from 1907 to 1913. After 
leaving school he went up to Caius Coll., Cambridge. 
In January 1915 he was gazetted to the 12th Cheshire 
Regiment, and accompanied it to France, and after- 
wards to Salonika. He won the Military Cross for 
" most conspicuous gallantry " in a raid carried out 
on the night of September 28-29, 1916, and was 
mentioned in despatches. 

Captain Sellars was reported " missing " after the 
advance on " P Ridge ", Salonika, on September 18, 
1918, and later was reported killed on that date. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 59 



Lieutenant Herbert Whiteley Sellars, M.C., Royal 
Air Force, was born in June 1896, and was at 
Loretto from 1910 to 1915. Corporal, O.T.C. After 
leaving school, instead of going up to Caius College, 
Cambridge, as lie had intended, he applied for a 
commission, and was gazetted to the Air Force in 
June 1916. 

Lieut. Sellars was awarded the Military Cross for 
" marked skill and gallantry " on an occasion when 
he engaged five enemy machines, shooting down two, 
and forcing a third to descend disabled. He was 
reported " missing " on May 15, 1918, and a later 
casualty list showed him as " killed in action " on 
that date. 



Major John Arthur Gordon Shanks, D.S.O., 6th 
Battn. (Terr.) Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 
was born in January 1891, and at Loretto 1906 to 
1907. He joined the Territorial Force in 1911, and 
went to France with his Battalion, the 6th A. and S. 
Highlanders, in April 1915, and served as Regimental 
Transport Officer. He was mentioned in despatches 
and awarded the D.S.O. So much fighting had his 
Battalion seen that, at his death, only his Colonel 
and himself were left of the original complement of 
officers who went on service. 

Major Shanks was struck by a splinter of H.E. 
shell on October 4, 1917, and died in a few minutes. 



60 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Lieutenant Hugh John Sladen Shields, R.A.M.C., 
born June 1887, was at Loretto 1899 to 1906. 
Prefect. He went up to Jesus Coll., Camb., and 
graduated B.A., M.B. with honours, 1910, gained his 
Rowing Blue, and stroked his College, and the Cam- 
bridge, crew, and also, with Fairbairn, won the Lowe 
Double Sculls (1910). Captain of his College XV., 
he also captained the Middlesex Hospital XV., where 
he was a Scholar and Prizeman. In 1913 he was 
Light Heavy-weight runner - up in the Army and 
Navy Boxing Championship. 

Lieut. Shields entered the R.A.M.C. in July 1912. 
In August 1914 he was attached to the Irish Guards, 
and mentioned in despatches October 1914. He was 
killed in action at Ypres whilst tending a wounded 
man on October 26, 1914. 



Lieutenant Frank Waddell Smail, 7th (Terr.) Battn. 
The Northumberland Fusiliers, was born in November 
1893, and was at Loretto 1907 to 1909. After leaving 
school he went in for farming. At the outbreak of 
war he enlisted in the Lothians and Border Horse, 
and early in 1915 went to France, having been 
commissioned in the 7th Battn. Northumberland 
Fusiliers. 

In June 1915 Lieut. Smail received a wound in the 
head, from the effects of which he never recovered, 
and, after lingering for six months, he died in a 
London hospital on December 1, 1915. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 61 



Lieutenant George Robert Graham Smeddle, R.F.C., 
was born in April 1898, and was at Loretto from 
1912 to 1916. XV. Corporal, O.T.C. From school 
he was specially nominated to a commission in the 
R.F.C. 

After six months in France, during which he 
did much good work, Lieut. Smeddle was appointed 
Instructor at the Flying School, Melton Mowbray, 
and was attached to the 38th, Home Defence, 
Squadron. On the night of March 11, 1918, after a 
flight, his machine collided with a tree whilst he was 
attempting to land in the darkness, and he was killed. 



Lieutenant William Sutton Smeeth, Royal Irish Rifles 
and R.F.C, was born in April 1895, and was at 
Loretto from 1909 to 1913. A member of the XL, 
he was a fine slow left-hand bowler. Corporal in the 
O.T.C. At the outbreak of war he joined the Royal 
Irish (now Royal Ulster) Rifles, and later transferred 
to the Flying Corps. 

Lieut. Smeeth served for some time in France, 
was wounded, and on recovery was appointed In- 
structor in Flying at Narborough, where he was 
accidentally killed on July 17, 1917, by an aeroplane 
which had got out of control. 



62 ROLL OF HONOUR 



2nd Lieutenant Charles Randolph Smith, R.G.A., 
was born in January 1898, and was at Loretto from 
1910 to 1916. Prefect. XV. Sergeant, O.T.C. 
Whilst at school he used to work in a munition 
factory during his holidays, and when he left he was 
posted to an Officer Cadet Battalion, whence he 
obtained a commission in the Royal Garrison Artillery, 
and went to France in December 1916. 

On April 22, 1917, at about 5.30 p.m., a shell 
burst in the Officers' Mess of his Battery. Lieut. 
Smith was struck by a splinter of the shell and 
mortally wounded. He died in a few minutes. 



2nd Lieutenant Frederick Foster Smith, R.A.F., was 
born in May 1897, and was at Loretto from 1910 to 
1915. XV. Corporal, O.T.C. On leaving school he 
obtained a commission in the Lothians and Border 
Horse, and saw a great deal of active service with 
them. In 1918 he transferred to the Air Force, and 
was employed on Seaplane patrol in the Channel. 

In September 1918 his plane was found in the sea, 
with Lieut. Smith, lashed to the float, badly wounded, 
having presumably been shot down by a German 
submarine. He died of his wounds very shortly after. 
His observer was never found. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 63 



Captain William Fulton Somervail, D.S.O., M.C., 3rd 
(att. 1st) Battn. The Cameronians, was born in May 
1892, and at Loretto 1904 to 1911. He joined the 
3rd (S.R.) Battn. Cameronians on August 15, 1914, 
and the 1st Battalion in France, December 1914. At 
Neuve Chapelle he — a 2nd Lieut. — commanded the 
Battalion for two days and won the M.C. In June 
1915 he was promoted Captain, and fought at Loos 
and on the Somme. In July 1917 he took command of 
his Battalion again, was made Temporary Lieutenant- 
Colonel, and awarded the D.S.O. In January 1918 
he became Brigade Major, 3rd Infantry Brigade. 

On October 4, 1918, Capt. Somervail and his 
Brigadier went out alone to reconnoitre, and were 
found later lying dead, killed by the same shell. 

Lieutenant Robert Stirling, 1st Battn. The Princess 
Louise's Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, was 
born in May 1892, and was at Loretto from 1908 to 
1910. After leaving school he passed into the Royal 
Military College, Sandhurst, and was gazetted in 
February 1912 to the 1st Battn. Argyll and Suther- 
land Highlanders, then stationed at Malta. His 
Battalion was serving in India at the outbreak of 
war, and came to Europe for active service in 
November 1914. 

Early in 1915 there was considerable fighting 
round St. Eloi, and Lieut. Stirling was killed in 
action near that place on February 19, 1915, whilst 
trying to assist one of his wounded men. 



64 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Lieutenant-Colonel John Collier Stormonth-Dar- 
ling, D.S.O., 1st Battn. The Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles), was born in February 1878, and at Loretto 
1892 to 1897. Prefect, School Prizeman, and XV. 
After leaving school he studied Law for a while, but 
in January 1900 he joined the 3rd Battn. (Militia) 
K.O.S.B., and was commissioned in the 2nd Battn. 
Scottish Rifles in August 1900. He served in South 
Africa and was mentioned in despatches. In 1914 he 
was Adjutant of the 1st Battalion and, with them, 
took part in the retreat from Mons. Early in 1916 
he was given command of a Battalion of H.L.I, and 
was killed in action on November 1, 1916. 

Colonel Stormonth - Darling was mentioned in 
despatches and awarded the D.S.O. 

2nd Lieutenant Kenneth Bruce Stuart, 6th (Service) 
Battn. The Durham Light Infantry, was born in 
January 1896, and was at Loretto 1906 to 1914. 
Musical Scholar. XV. Corporal, O.T.C. On leaving 
school he went to the Royal College of Music. After 
the outbreak of war he obtained a commission in the 
6th D.L.I., and went with them to France. During 
the Battle of the Somme his Battalion was attacking 
the Butte de Martencourt. Few officers were left, 
and Lieut. Stuart, who was Signalling Officer, volun- 
teered to lead the assault. Three times the attack 
was held up by machine-gun fire, but Stuart insisted 
on a fourth attempt, during which he was shot dead 
at the head of his men, November 5, 1916. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 65 



Lieutenant Percy George Symington, 17th (Service) 
Battn. The Highland Light Infantry, was born in 
March 1896, and was at Loretto from 1910 to 1914. 
Sergeant, O.T.C. A very fine golfer, he won, whilst 
still at school, the Cup given for the best scratch score 
in the South of Ireland Championship. After leaving 
school he was to have gone into residence at King's 
Coll., Cambridge, but he joined the Army instead, 
and was gazetted to the 17th H.L.I, as 2nd 
Lieutenant. 

Lieut. Symington was killed instantaneously on 
July 1, 1916, on the Somme, whilst leading his 
Platoon to the attack. His cousin, Capt. Boyd 
(O.L.), was killed with him. 



Captain James Gordon Tawse, R.F.A., born in July 
1891, was at Loretto from 1905 to 1909. XV. He 
joined a Territorial Artillery Brigade some little time 
before the war, and was a keen gunner. In May 
1915 he went to France with his Artillery Brigade 
(2nd Highland). The following November he was 
invalided home, and in January 1917 returned to the 
front with the 293rd Brigade R.F.A. 

Shortly after this Capt. Tawse was given command 
of C Battery, 291st Brigade, and was severely wounded 
in the early morning of April 15, 1917, and died the 
same day after reaching hospital. 



E 



66 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Lieutenant James McEwen Thomson Taylor, M.C., 
6th Battn. Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, was 
born in April 1898, and was at Loretto from 1913 to 
1916. XV. Corporal, O.T.C. On leaving school he 
obtained a commission in the 6th Battn. Cameron 
Highlanders, and saw a great deal of fighting. He 
was awarded the Military Cross for " conspicuous 
bravery ", and later won a bar to his Cross. 

Lieut. Taylor was badly gassed in France, and, 
whilst on leave in 1919, he suffered from the after- 
effects of the gas poison, which brought on a severe 
attack of pneumonia, from which he died on February 
27, 1919. 



Lieutenant Robert Bertram Taylor, 2nd Battn. 1st 
Canadian Division, was born in June 1886, and was 
at Loretto in 1895. At the outbreak of war he 
enlisted as a private in Canada, and landed in France 
with his Battalion early in 1915. Serving in the 
ranks till the end of that year, he then passed the 
examination for his commission at St. Omer, was 
gazetted Lieutenant, and given the usual leave to 
England to outfit. He returned to Flanders early in 
1916, and was serving in the Ypres Salient when he 
was killed in action on April 27, 1916. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 67 



2nd Lieutenant William George Teacher, 15th (Ser- 
vice) Battn. Highland Light Infantry, was born in 
December 1893, and was at Loretto from 1909 to 
1912. He was a Prefect, and was a member of the 
XV. for three years, and a Sergeant in the O.T.C. 
At the outbreak of war he applied for a commission, 
and was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the 15th Battn. 
H.L.I, in September 1914. His Battalion was doing 
its tour of duty in the trenches at Autheuil in France, 
and 2nd Lieut. Teacher, who was at the time com- 
manding his Company, was killed whilst going round 
his front-line trenches on May 14, 1916. 



2nd Lieutenant Arthur John Gordon Thomas, 6th 
(Terr.) Battn. The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), 
was born in June 1895, and was at Loretto from 1909 
to 1913. Prefect. XV. Sergeant Piper, O.T.C. At 
the outbreak of war he tried several times to join the 
Army, but was refused on account of defective eye- 
sight. Finally he was accepted, and joined the 9th 
(Terr.) Battn. Royal Scots as a private, and soon 
afterwards was given a commission in the 6th Black 
Watch. 

Lieut. Thomas was shot dead on June 3, 1916, 
whilst trying to locate a sniper who had already, that 
day, very narrowly missed him at Vimy Ridge. 



68 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Captain George Alastair Sinclair Thomson, att. 2nd 
Battn. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, was born 
in June 1892, and was at Loretto from 1908 to 1910. 
On leaving school he took up sheep-farming in New 
Zealand, and was in that country when war broke out 
He returned home at once and secured a commission 
in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. He went 
to France early in 1915, and was soon after given 
his Captaincy. 

Capt. Sinclair Thomson, who was then with the 
2nd Battalion of his Regiment, was superintending 
the digging of a trench by his men, on July 12, 1916, 
when he was shot by a sniper and killed on the spot. 



2nd Lieutenant Sydney James Kerr Thomson, 3rd 
(att. 1st) Battn. Royal Scots Fusiliers, was born in 
July 1888, and was at Loretto 1904 to 1906. School 
Prizeman. On leaving school he went to Edinburgh 
University, and took his B.Sc. degree in 1910, with 
honours in Engineering. He was a Director of the 
firm of Thomson Bros., Ltd., Dundee. 

When the war broke out Lieut. Thomson enlisted 
in the Public Schools Battalion and served in the 
Machine-gun Section. He obtained his commission 
in the 3rd Royal Scots Fusiliers in February 1915, 
and joined the 1st Battn. in France as Machine-gun 
Officer in May. He died of wounds October 13, 1915. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 69 



2nd Lieutenant Joseph Simpson M'Kenzie Tombs, 
R.F.A., was born in November 1888, and at Loretto 
1903 to 1905. XV. School Prizeman. He was a 
partner in a Liverpool Broker's office, and was also 
making a name for himself in the literary world. He 
was a regular contributor to Punch and dramatic 
critic to the Daily Post. 

As soon as war broke out Lieut. Tombs enlisted 
in the 10th Battn. King's Liverpool Regiment (Liver- 
pool Scottish). He was invalided home from France 
suffering from frost-bite in the winter of 1914. As 
soon as he was fit he obtained a commission in the 
R.F.A. He returned to France, was wounded on 
September 7, 1915, and died from his wounds on 
September 11, 1915. 

Major Francis Maxwell Chenevix Trench, R.F.A. , 
was born in September 1879, and at Loretto 1892 
to 1896. A School Prizeman, he entered the R.M. 
Academy, was commissioned in 1898, and served in 
South Africa (twice mentioned in despatches), and 
in the 1908 Soudan Campaign. He was a graduate 
of the Staff College and 1st class interpreter in 
Arabic. He went with the B.E.F. to France as 
Brigade Major, Divisional Artillery, 2nd Infantry 
Division. On October 31, 1914, the day after his 
promotion to Major's rank, he attended a Staff 
Conference at Hooge Chateau, where a German shell 
burst, killing him and five other staff officers. Men- 
tioned despatches January 14, 1915. 



70 ROLL OF HONOUR 



Captain Ian Ure, 6th (Terr.) Battn. Argyll and Suther- 
land Highlanders, was born in April 1885, and was at 
Loretto from 1898 till 1903. Prefect. XV. Cricket 
and Hockey XL's. 

Captain Ure obtained a commission in the 3/9th 
A. and S. Highlanders in 1917, and in the same year 
proceeded overseas to France, where he joined the 
6th Battalion of his Regiment as a Company Com- 
mander. With this Battalion he went to Italy, where 
he was killed in 1918 by the explosion of a bomb. 



Lieutenant John Weston Warner, D.F.C., Royal 
Flying Corps, was born in July 1899, and was at 
Loretto from June to December 1915. As soon as 
he was old enough he joined the R.F.C, and quickly 
gained a great reputation as a righting airman. 
Lieut. Warner was officially credited with destroying 
eight enemy machines and disabling three others. 
He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for 
his services. 

On October 4, 1918, Lieut. Warner was reported 
" missing ". Later he was reported as ' killed in 
action in France " on that date. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 71 



Captain Robert Milne Ballantyne Welsh, 7th (Ser- 
vice) Battn. The Border Regiment, was born in July 
1892, and was at Loretto from 1906 to 1911. He 
obtained a commission in the 7th Battn. Border 
Regiment, and saw a great deal of fighting in Flanders 
and France. He was twice wounded. The second 
time was during the Somme battle in July 1916. On 
his recovery from this injury he returned to France 
late in December 1916, and was promoted Captain in 
February 1917. 

Captain Welsh was reported " missing " on April 
23, 1917, and later was reported as killed on that date. 



Captain John Percy Whelan, 2nd Battn. Royal Irish 
Rifles, was born in May 1879, and at Loretto 1891 to 
1898. He was in the XV. and XI. After leaving 
school he joined the 3rd Battn. Royal Irish Fusiliers, 
and from it was gazetted in 1902 to the 4th Battn. 
Royal Garrison Regiment, which was raised during 
the Boer War. On its disbandment he was trans- 
ferred to the 2nd R.I.R. (now the Royal Ulster 
Rifles). In 1914 he was serving with the 1st Battn. 
at Aden, and was at home on sick leave when war 
broke out. As soon as he was fit he was sent out to 
the 2nd Battn. (7th Infantry Brigade) in Flanders, and 
was killed in the Ypres Salient, December 11, 1914. 



72 ROLL OF HONOUR 



2nd Lieutenant Geoffrey Lacey Whitelaw, The 
Household (Cavalry) Battalion, was born May 1898, 
and was at Loretto 1912 to 1916. House Prefect. 
XV. XI. Corporal, O.T.C. He obtained a com- 
mission in the Household Cavalry, and went to France 
with a draft in May 1917. He joined his Battalion 
in June, and was wounded on July 15. He was 
wounded again on August 22. After recovering he 
was hit in the leg, on October 12, 1917, but remained 
in action for twelve hours afterwards. 

After convalescence Lieut. Whitelaw was passed 

' fit " in March 1918, but just after this he had an 

acute attack of enteritis and appendicitis. He was 

operated on, but after a plucky fight died on April 

14, 1918. 



Captain John George Wood, M.C., 3rd (Reserve) 
Battn. The Seaforth Highlanders, was born in March 
1895, and was at Loretto from 1908 to 1914. XV. 
Corporal, O.T.C. On leaving school he was gazetted 
to the 3rd Seaforths and, after a period of training, 
joined a Battalion of the Regiment in France. For 
his services during the year 1916 he was awarded the 
Military Cross. 

In October 1917, during a counter-attack by his 
Battalion, Captain Wood, hearing that one of his 
Lewis guns was short of ammunition, ran across the 
open with a fresh supply, and was shot dead as he 
reached the gun. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 73 



Captain Alexander Gerald Wordsworth, 2nd Battn. 
The Middlesex Regiment, a great-grandson of the 
poet, was born in October 1880, and at Loretto 1894 
to 1900. He joined the 3rd (Militia) Battn. Border 
Regiment in May 1900, and in January 1902 was 
gazetted to the 2nd Battn. Middlesex Regiment. 

Captain Wordsworth served in the South African 
War, was promoted Lieutenant, May 1904, and 
Captain, March 1912. He was Adjutant of his 
Battalion from March 1911 to March 1914, and went 
with it to Flanders in 1914. He was killed in action, 
in the trenches, near Laventie, Belgium, on December 
6, 1914. 



Major Cyril Rutherford Young, Durham Royal Gar- 
rison Artillery, was born in February 1886, and was 
at Loretto from 1901 to 1904. After leaving school 
he studied engineering, and took his B.Sc. degree 
at Durham University. He went to France as a sub- 
altern with the 41st Siege Battery, R.G.A., early in 
1915. In 1916 he was sent home to train and com- 
mand the 253rd Siege Battery, and he returned with 
it to France as a Major, early in 1917. 

On June 7, 1917, at the Battle of Messines Ridge, 
Major Young was severely wounded. He was sent 
back to England on June 9, and died of his wounds 
in a London hospital, July 1, 1917. 



74 ROLL OF HONOUR 



2nd Lieutenant Leslie Duncan Young, 3rd (Special 
Reserve) Battn. The Lancashire Fusiliers, att. Man- 
chester Regiment, was born in April 1893, and was 
at Loretto from 1907 to 1910. Whilst at school he 
had a great reputation as a long-distance runner, and 
won a medal for the mile in 4 mins. 52 sees, (on grass). 
Lieut. Young joined the Lancashire Fusiliers 
Special Reserve Battalion, but was sent out to join a 
Battalion of the Manchester Regiment in France. 
On October 8, 1917, a shell burst close to him, and 
killed him instantaneously. 



2nd Lieutenant David George Younger, 17th (Ser- 
vice) Battn. The Highland Light Infantry, was born 
in March 1893, and was at Loretto from 1907 to 1910. 
XV. Shortly after the outbreak of war he enlisted 
as a private, and later was commissioned in the H.L.I. 
At 7.30 a.m. on July 1, 1916, the Battle of the 
Somme began with an attack by the British from 
Gommecourt to Montauban, a front of twenty miles. 
The 17th H.L.I, was one of the Battalions taking 
part, and Lieut. Younger was shot dead by machine- 
gun fire during this attack, July 1, 1916. 



Description of Memorial 

and 

Memorial Service 



Description of Memorial in Chapel 



The Memorial takes the form of a Stone Altar at the East end of 
the Chapel, severely but effectively treated. In the centre of the 
front is carved a cross, surrounded by a design of the Passion Flower, 
and on the base of the Altar the words are carved — 

" He gave His only begotten Son." 

Round the walls of the Apse, carved in large lettering on the stone, 
on a band below the stained-glass windows, are the words — 

" Greater love hath no man than this 
That a man lay down his life for his friends." 

At the other end of the Chapel there is an oak Screen across the 
front of the organ gallery. 

The Screen is divided into bays by pillars surmounted by richly 
carved arches, finished at the top with a deep band of pierced carving, 
into the design of which the vine is effectively introduced. 

The lower part of the Screen is filled in with panels, on which are 
carved the names of the 141 old boys who fell in the war. These are 
surmounted by pierced panels ; into the centre of each of these are 
worked the Arms of one of the principal Allies, blazoned in colours. 

On the one side are the Arms of France, Belgium, Italy, and 
America, and on the other side are the Arms of Canada, Australia, 
New Zealand, and South Africa. Above the centre panel there is 
the emblem of Great Britain, and above this on either side are carved 
figures of Angels, with trumpets heralding a paean of Victory. 

On the panel below is carved the following inscription — 

" To the Glory of God and in proud memory of the Sons 

OF LORETTO, WHO, IN THE GREATEST OF ALL WARS BY LAND AND 
SEA AND AIR, FACED DEATH FOR FREEDOM, AND PASSED OUT OF 
THE SIGHT OF MEN." 

Underneath is a scroll held by two Angel figures, upon which are 
carved the words — ■ 

" ALL THAT THEY HAD THEY GAVE." 



* 



Memorial Service 



A Memorial Service was held in Loretto Chapel on Friday, 3rd 
February 1922, at 3.30 p.m., in presence of the Staff, the whole 
School, a large number of the relatives of those who fell, and subscribers 
to the fund. 

The Rev. E. W. Clarke conducted the service, H. B. Tristram read 
the lesson, and the Headmaster read the names of the fallen, giving 
the boys their Christian names as they were known at School. Mrs. 
Almond unveiled the Memorial Panel, and C. J. G. Paterson, Chairman 
of the Memorial Committee, gave the following address : — 

" We are all gathered here to-day in our own School Chapel, not 
I am sure in any formal manner, but rather as the members of one 
Family, drawn together by one common wish, to do honour before 
God to the memory of our Schoolfellows, who, in the great war, went 
forth to fight the good fight, and made the supreme sacrifice. 

" In those fateful years over 500 sons of Loretto answered the 
call to arms, and to all of these we offer tribute, for all faced the 
common danger, none shunned the fight nor feared to die. 

" Happily to many it was given to return home — alas, those whose 
names have been read, have passed out of the sight of men, and when 
we think of other days and other scenes, when they took their part 
in all the activities of the School, we are only human when we mourn 
their loss ; but our sorrow is in some way softened with a thrill of 
new-found happiness, when we remember that these deeds in the 
great cause of freedom and honour were done by those we know, and 
those we love. 

" And never let us forget this truly wonderful thing, for it is a 
beautiful and a comforting thought, that these men, young as nearly 
all of them are, in the summer of life, and as we thought merely on 
the threshold of their career, have actually fulfilled their task in life, 
done all that was asked of them, and now in the silent land have 
reached the highest goal which all men strive for. 

" It is left to us who stay behind to follow their high example, and 
so fulfil our task, as to be worthy of the prize already won by them. 

" And what sent these men forth — no love of gain — no thought 
of self — not even that fine spirit of adventure, so inherent in our race, 
which takes men to unknown lands in search only of knowledge to 
enrich our minds. No, it was the simple but stern call of duty, love 
of country and love of home, that no usurper's foot should soil our 



78 MEMORIAL SERVICE 



land, strengthened by the conviction that the cause was righteous 
and just — a fact which all history since has only confirmed. 

" And they ask no reward. Aye — true, they ask no reward ; but 
it is only meet and right that we their comrades — for ' living or dead 
we are comrades all ' — and their friends should raise to them a worthy 
and a visible Memorial, so that their deeds should not be forgotten, 
and should be known, not only to us, but to those who come after us. 

" It is said — the memory of such deeds will never die — to times 
unborn a sacred name. 

" God grant that it may be so, but surely in a school we are 
privileged to place landmarks of remembrance, for these deeds do not 
belong only to us, but are held in trust to be handed on untarnished 
to those who come after, and by them to those who follow. 

" It is right, therefore, to preserve their record in the most beautiful 
setting, and in the place most sacred to us all, where we have worshipped 
together — rejoiced together — and where our best resolutions are made. 

" And what do our Memorials represent, what lesson do they 
teach — what story do they tell ? Not only our pride in the gallant 
deeds of our Schoolfellows, although we are rightly proud of them. 

" No, that is not their whole story — that is not all they represent. 
Turn your eyes to the Sanctuary — look on the Altar, and again on 
the Memorial panel — 

" ' Greater love hath no man than this — that a man lay down 
his life for his friends.'' 

" ' He gave His only begotten Son.' 

" ' All that they had they gave.' 

" Our life for others — just the old old story of the Cross — the 
emblem of the greatest sacrifice the world has ever known. 

" And the same golden thread runs through the other Memorials 
— the Scholarship Fund to help others on the way, the Memorial 
Field, where we learn to use our talents for others and not for our- 
selves — for the honour and success of our School, and not for our 
own, and where we are taught to follow the example of those it com- 
memorates, and to play the game always — aye, even to the end. 

" We also know that the same thought prompted the generous 
gifts of those personal Memorials — all of which we desire to-day 
gratefully to acknowledge. 



MEMORIAL SERVICE 79 



" Yes, the spirit of sacrifice is the bright star shining through all 
the darkness and horrors of war. That is what we wish to perpetuate 
— for that is the spirit in which the war was fought and the war was 
won by our men, the spirit shown by them on the field and off the 
field, to friend and foe alike. 

" May it be with us, and with our School throughout life, for 
sacrifice is greater than success. 

" Alas, we are all very human, and even to-day we must frankly 
face the danger — lest we forget — so do not let us think that when we 
have raised these Memorials we have finished our task and paid our 
debt, nor let us look on them as merely inanimate things which cannot 
speak. Let us rather try and regard them as an inspiration to us 
to make our lives worthy of the noble deeds done by men, and by 
women too, in the days of the great war, and let us hear, through 
them, the voices of those who are gone, calling on us to give some of 
our life for others — to go through the world with a smiling face, 
trying to shed happiness around us, and so make this world a better 
one to live in. 

" If we succeed in this, then indeed we shall have raised a truly 
living Memorial, and one more lasting even than these monuments 
of wood and stone. 

" To-day we are honouring the memory of our own Schoolfellows ; 
but we would wish — they would wish — that we should also honour 
in our thoughts the memory of their gallant comrades of all ranks, 
who shared with them the same danger, and gained with them the 
same glory — for whether they came from Public School or Board 
School, from castle or cottage, or village or town — to all alike, we 
owe our deliverance. 

" We are now paying homage to the dead, but we would like to 
be allowed to offer our tribute of respectful sympathy to the relatives 
of those whose names we commemorate, and to thank them for their 
share in the sacrifice, and for their silent bravery under a great sorrow. 
Grief to them is natural, but there must also be a righteous pride and 
a holy joy, in what has been done for others by their own flesh and 
blood, and may it be some consolation to them to remember — that 
happy is the man who went out of this world by the path of sacrifice. 

" And now — in the name of all Lorettonians, all Loretto boys, 
and every one interested in the School, we have by this service to-day 
dedicated our Memorials ' To the Glory of God, and in proud memory 



80 MEMORIAL SERVICE 



of the Sons of Loretto, who, in the greatest of all wars by land and 
sea and air, faced death for freedom, and passed out of the sight 
of men.'' 

" ' All that they had they gave.' 

" May their great example brighten our lives, may their great 
example incite us all to good and unselfish acts, and may we never 
forget, that these men, and alas, thousands and thousands of others, 
have given their lives, not only for their Country and their King, but 
also for all of us, that we may live in our own dear land in peace.'"